knowledge

“Instead of buying your children all the things you never had, you should teach them all the things you were never taught. Material wears out but knowledge stays.”

—Bruce Lee

elements

Week 6 of 8. Also the wind-up (or is it wind-down?) of the first half of the Fall term. As my previous post noted, the end-goal of this 8 week session is to develop a framework. Specifically, the alignment between research interest, research question, theories, and a sample of literature. Sounds easy, right?

Finding that unifying these elements is no small task. I didn't anticipate that it would be. However, my research is proving to be the most problematic. There is little data, qualitative or quantitative, that supports my problem statement. At least, newer studies (within the last five years) are scant. 

However, I put this slideshow together. It's basic. It's riddled with errors and it needs clarification by way of refining sample literature. It's also missing the Voicethread narration, but it's a start.

*Once this Voicethread is complete, I will post it here for your critique. Feedback welcome!



frameworks

Learning about frameworks: conceptual, practical, and theoretical. Framework(s) is a word that gets thrown around a lot in education circles. But, there are so many other considerations:

  • alignment
  • findings
  • data
  • rhetoric
  • the air speed velocity of an unladen swallow


creativity, inquiry, & innovation

Wrapping up the third week of the first half of the Fall semester. Currently, learning about creativity, inquiry, & innovation. Also, researching instructional technologies. A lot. 

Finding that there are numerous studies that speak to the efficiencies in using tech in the classroom, but very few speaking to the enhancement of learning, or infusing higher-order thinking skills. I am working "to interpret, analyze, synthesize, and develop an argument for [my] research."

By the way, what ever happened to the Bloom’s Digital Taxonomy?

Every great cause begins as a movement, becomes a business, and eventually degenerates into a racket.

—Eric Hoffer



play

I had a one week break before the Fall semester began. It was nice having that week free of doctoral studies, as I prepared to return to the classroom full time. I am now a week into the Fall session, and two weeks into the middle school 2019-202 year.

It has been a struggle to balance classes and research, but not in ways I anticipated. Meaning, I feel guilty for retiring to my office to read or write when I could be spending that time in ways that benefit others and myself.

But, I keep telling myself that this is only for a short time. Labor Day weekend is coming, and I am working furiously to complete the assignments due Saturday so I can enjoy some time to play. #selfcareisnotselfish


intentional

Every letter. Every space. Every line space.
Every bit of it is intentional. It is deliberate.
Why am I writing about typesetting and the care it requires? Mostly because I am in a reflective mood on this last day of summer break. I am just winding down the second 8-week session of my doctoral program, and I am thinking about what it will take to get to the finish line. Also, it's a school night—PD session tomorrow morning, followed by a staff meeting. Tuesday is a teacher work day, and the students return Wednesday!

And, I want to ensure that all of my actions are intentional. I want to continue to learn and grow, and I want the same for the students. They deserve it. And, maybe if that intentional type of learning is modeled for them, it just might stick.   

Side note: someone asked about the picture in my previous post. Specifically, the question addressed the way in which spacing is achieved within the words and the material at the end of the bottom line. The answer lies in quads and spacers (pictured above). Much like kerning and tracking on digital text layouts, there are defined widths used in letterpress. However, working with metal type is more like mortising.

Have I bored you to tears yet? Good. The em dash and the (more common) en dash form the basic units of spacing. For filling larger spaces, furniture and reglets are needed. Typesetting requires careful intent and deliberation...which is why it is such a great metaphor for learning.