human capital

New course started yesterday. First post requires a bit of research to define “human capital” using a source other than the textbook or required readings. Interestingly, most of the the sources point to Adam Smith (of Scotland) or Marxist writings with the respect to the origin of the theory/idea of human capital. 

In a nutshell, several theories of human capital exist. And, in true fashion, there are alternative viewpoints that focus on Intellectual Capital, Social Capital, or Cultural Capital. Seems to me that it boils down to the old argument between information, knowledge, and ignorance. As a result, here’s what I’ve got so far: 

A fact is information minus emotion. An opinion is information plus experience. Ignorance is an opinion lacking information. And, stupidity is an opinion that ignores a fact.  

quantitative analysis

The past few weeks have been intense. Intense with analysis and statistics. I have learned far more about regression analysis, t-tests, and ANOVA than I ever thought I might. And, I hate to break it to Salkind & Frey, but I still do not care for statistics. Hate is a strong word, but I do give the authors credit for making quantitive analysis slightly more palatable. 
I will say that I hate SPSS software. It is not only ridiculously expensive—it is ugly from a design perspective. I mean, a company who has beautifully designed websites, and even offered up one of my favorite typefaces for free, could do a little better. SPSS looks like the old Excel versions on Windows CE. Thankfully, the Dutch know how to make things pretty. And, they know how to make them open-source. Love me some JASP, even if it still is all about statistics.  
ps—speaking of the Dutch, Eddie Van Halen passed away today. We lost another one of the good ones today. RIP, Eddie. 

right now

The last few weeks have been stressful, really. There is no one contributing factor. It's all of it. I have been walking 3-4 miles per day in the morning just to relieve some of the stress. It helps. And, it makes for some nice sunrises. 

I know others feel this stress in various ways, and cope with the stress in their own ways. The sudden shut-down of schools in California on March 13th stressed everyone. The sudden realization that not all teachers are prepared to teach online...and that many students do not have access to wifi or a device. The businesses shutting down. The panic buying. 

Then, came talk of reopening businesses in California, only to be followed by the sudden decision on June 17th to close some businesses again. Panic buying is starting to trend again. My son's senior year will begin online. My school district has decided to go all-in with a traditional model (as of today) with the offer of an online model. To be honest, I am not sure how I feel about any of the models. I need to do more research. 

re-opening school

I have given a lot of thought to the re-opening of schools in August. And, I have listened to some rich discussions on the matter. Twitter is full of thoughts on the idea. Several articles have been published recently that give me pause. This one made me chuckle...because there is a fine line between laughing and crying. 

Yet, it is maddening to think that leadership at the federal level keeps pushing misinformation or denying the science. I do not know what school will look like in August when students return. But, I know some tough decisions need to be made...by all stakeholders.  

I love the public schools my kids attend, but I also know they can't handle a lice outbreak on a good day and are not equipped to handle COVID on a bad one. School principals and superintendents are not epidemiologists or virologists and can’t possibly be expected to make plans like they are. 

—Dan Sinker, Esquire