tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:/posts QS PRN 2022-01-16T01:15:50Z Shea tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1783621 2022-01-16T01:15:50Z 2022-01-16T01:15:50Z 2022

What an action-packed couple of weeks. The omicron variant has surged here in Northern California, as it has done everywhere. The parents closed the deal on the sale of their property. And, my research design class has begun.  

It has been nice, being out of class for October and November. For 2.5 years, my doctoral classes ran straight through summer, fall, and winter with very few breaks. This most recent break at the end of 2021 came about because of my transfer to another college. It was not planned. Yet, since enrolling in the doctoral program, I have learned a lot about myself. 

Sure, I have learned about other things. I have read numerous books and countless journal articles. I have lost track of the number of papers I have written and the total number of annotated bibliographies. And, I have changed my thoughts on my research topic several times along the way.  

This current 11-week class will allow me to shape my research and begin the dissertation phase. Of course, there is a 5-week session for the final exam after this course, so my dissertation will not begin until summer session. The dissertation phase will run through the fall session and end with the spring 2023 session. And, that's a little disheartening. 

While I am happy to know that the finish line is in sight, I am frustrated that I am faced with another year of research. It is agonizing to think that I will not officially graduate the doctoral program for another calendar year. To stay focused and to stay on the path, I began to think about what is going right. And, I find a little joy in the little things...like a nice sunrise, a quality pencil and trusty notebook, and an annotated book of Tennyson's poems that belonged to my great grandfather.

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1764650 2021-12-01T02:24:43Z 2021-12-01T02:24:43Z ruby

I said goodby to a dear friend today. While I am full of sadness, I take comfort in the fact that this little dog brought so much joy to not only my life but to my son's life. Ruby was his first dog, and she lived a great life for 14 years. 

She was stubborn and bull-headed, but that’s what made her adorable. She always ate first and asked questions later. But, cancer reared it’s ugly head. She tried to battle it, and was brave to the end. It’s only fitting that we say goodbye on a Tuesday. Goodbye, sweet girl. 

Ruby Tuesday

Ruby bonded with C from the moment we brought her home. And, she taught us to see the simple joys of life in your 14+ years with us. Oh, she were stubborn but that’s just one of the things we adored about her. She was always up for adventure and she wagged that tail until the very end. She was pure of heart and she was absolutely the bestest of doggos. 

Run wild, and sniff all the things. Eat first and ask questions later. Be free, Ruby girl. 




]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1763858 2021-11-28T20:27:16Z 2021-11-28T20:27:29Z thanksgiving

Traditionally, this is a time of year for giving thanks. And, while I am thankful for many things, I have been giving that word "tradition" a lot of thought lately. Gratitude is a constant in my life but as I get older I am beginning to understand that some traditions carry forward and other traditions come to an abrupt end. And, I’m not sure how I feel about that.  

One tradition that is coming to an end, after a 30-year run is the tradition of meeting for Thanksgiving and Christmas at my parents home. They have decided to sell their home and move to a condominium. I’m going to miss that 6-acre property and all the memories made there, during holidays and regular days. I already miss the animals: the dogs, cats, llamas, goats, chickens, and miniature donkeys. 

It’s an odd thing to watch traditions be slowly disassembled. My parents are in the process of downsizing, donating and selling things. In some ways, it is odd to see them part with so many things they've gathered over their 50+ years of marriage, and as individuals over 80+ years of life. When I visit, I take as many pictures as I can...knowing that those images may be the last things left after the traditions are gone. 




]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1743394 2021-10-03T20:49:07Z 2021-10-04T00:23:39Z fall 2021
Welcome to decorative gourd season, 2021! 

Upside: I am so close to completing the prescribed list of courses for my doctoral program, and should be finished by the end of October.  

Downside: I am forced to wait until Spring 2022 semester to begin the research/dissertation phase. 

Honestly, there are so many positives and negatives to my current situation that I feel like I should make a T-chart. One the one hand, I will have a nice break over November and December. On the other hand, this delay pushes my graduation date out by a semester. I'll stop there before I get myself irritated over the whole mess that was initiated with Concordia University Portland suddenly closing their operations after I was 1.5 years deep into the program. Ugh. 

Instead, I will focus on the positives. Hey, maybe I'll have time to clean up this clown show of a website. It is in serious need of updating. After all, I began this site as a way to document the processes, pains, and products of my doctoral studies. And, maybe get back into the letterpress workshop and make something! 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1713887 2021-07-15T21:36:42Z 2021-07-15T21:36:42Z sorts

This summer I’ve been sorting. Sorting a lot of things: assignments for my terminal degree, schedules and timelines, clothing for donations, items in the garage. 

Yesterday, I had a few minutes to sort my type cabinets. Technically, the individual drawers are known as job cases. Although, I realized that I had not sorted them properly since moving my work shop & letterpress printing equipment last April. All 48 drawers were stacked in the garage and then reinserted into the cabinet in no particular order. "I'll sort it later," I told myself. 

Over a year has passed, and I am still sorting. Only, my sorting logistics seemed to be constantly shuffled this past year. C will be moving out mid August to attend University of Nevada Reno. I report to the school district August 9 for the 2021-2022 contract. And, I am continuing to pursue my doctoral degree (approximately one year til completion!).

While sorting this out, I realize that I also need to sort this site...to add additional classes, topics of research, and published papers. For now, I've got a solid to-do list going on my notepad app. I'll get it sorted soon. 

*image of 48pt titling sorts   

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1711460 2021-07-08T00:13:34Z 2021-07-08T00:13:35Z Kaua'i

Finally made it to Kaua'i. This trip was planned for the summer of 2020, but delayed due to the pandemic. It was a bit of a battle to get there...COVID test 72 hours prior, uploading information to the Safe Travels website, obtaining the wristband to board the airplane. But, it was worth it. 

I actually read several fiction books while on vacation. Caught up on the Harry Hole series by Jo Nesbø. I'll spare the full reviews but they did not disappoint. First time that has happened in two years, since I began my doctoral program. Had a wonderful dinner at The Beach House. Swam in the ocean and the pool. Tasted some amazing Kōloa Rum.  Ate the most delicious Sugarloaf Pineapple

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1672466 2021-03-31T03:10:39Z 2021-03-31T20:09:32Z greenery

Really into plants lately. I have always been interested in plants, honestly. However, this past year has given me time to focus on the plants I have in the house. I searched for a Norfolk Island Pine for months, but finally found one (in the black container below). 

My grandmother had one that was over five feel tall. Hoping mine will reach that height some day, like the fiddle leaf fig. 

And, I have been growing some more succulents from cuttings. Love these little jade plants. Plants really do make things brighter around the house. A little positivity is a good thing.  


]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1672469 2021-03-20T19:00:00Z 2021-03-31T03:10:20Z napa

It’s been a while. Well over a year since I’ve visited Napa, for business or pleasure. I suppose that the pandemic is to blame, like many of us who wanted to travel but decided to self-quarantine. Maybe some of use wanted to travel but no shops or stores were open. 

This isn’t a political commentary on the handling of the COVID-19 pandemic. It’s simply an observation. Just as many of the businesses wanted to remain open, many of us wanted to get out of the house, many of us could not get out due to concerns about COVID and/or government regulations. 

But, I love the way the way many businesses were able to work around the mandates and directives. Hooray for Napa and St. Helena! 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1665283 2021-03-13T19:54:52Z 2021-03-13T19:54:52Z spring

Now that Daylight Savings Time is upon us, I began thinking about change. This morning, on a long walk, I reflected back on what has happened these last couple months.

Like many people, the pandemic has changed my routines, my priorities, and my sense of normalcy. Yet, that is not necessarily a negative change. The things I took for granted have a renewed sense of meaning. And, priorities have been replaced with healthier options in both the physical and mental sense. 

In late January, I became eligible to receive the COVID immunization due to my position in education. Pfizer was the only option, as all the Modern vaccines appointments were slotted by the time I logged in to schedule my appointment. To be honest, I did not care which vaccine I received...I just wanted to stack the odds against contracting COVID, especially with the changes at school.   

The district has returned to a traditional schedule, and eliminated the hybrid model. And, it will be interesting to see how the 2021-2022 school year plays out. The online school model will run through this year, but it will be interesting to see if the online learning model continues to be an option for students/parents in the coming years. 

My doctoral program continues, under an online model. And, I continue to reflect on my priorities to finish the program, examine career opportunities, and return to the print shop. ⟳ 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1634918 2021-01-02T19:40:04Z 2021-01-02T19:44:55Z time and accrual

2/365 

Some things that have crossed my mind in the last 24 hours: 

  • Parkinson’s Law—a task will shrink or expand to fit the time allotted to it. 
  • Protect your calendar.  
  • The bad news is time flies. The good news is you’re the pilot.

“This past year [2020] has taught me that ritual is the antidote to chaos. Small rituals, when practiced daily, give a sense of order to the mind.”  

ac·cru·al (/əˈkro͞oəl/)

[noun] the accumulation or increase of something over time   



]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1634859 2021-01-01T20:00:00Z 2021-01-02T16:47:09Z intentional

The new year typically prompts review and reflection. Everywhere you look, there are blog posts, news pieces, and clever marketing focusing on the year that was and the year that could be. 

2020 seems to have intensified this cycle. And, while I am not one for resolutions, I have been reflecting on the ways I could improve. My current train of thought: no lame resolutions, only strong executions. With that, I've decided to focus on intent. 

1/365

Fournier 30pt, mirror image 
]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1627538 2020-12-13T22:08:38Z 2020-12-13T22:08:38Z inspiration

Where do you get your inspiration? I mean, where do you find your inspiration to create something? Inspiration is something I've thought about this past week, as I wrapped up my final research paper for the Fall term. Like many people, I used to find my inspiration in outdoor places or through conversations with others. With the pandemic, those conversation don't look or feel like they did in the past. Most conversations are digital these days. 

My creative outlet for that inspiration is letterpress printing. Since I began my doctoral program, I have had little time to print. Regardless of what some might say, a doctorate in education is challenging. It demands a lot of time to complete. I knew this going into the program, and I understood that my other pursuits would be set aside for three years. And, I have realized that I miss that time. 

I have missed the time spent with others. I miss the conversations and the activities. I miss the inspiration and the authenticity of in-person conversations. I realize that COVID has altered the way we communicate, and I realize that my doctoral program has altered the time I have available to find that inspiration. Trust that I am not complaining. And, I am thankful to live in such a beautiful part of the world that offers so many opportunities to explore the outdoors for inspiration. I am also thankful for the internet and social media for providing some avenues of inspiration. But, with the Fall semester now over and a pending two-week winter break from work, I am excited to get back into the printshop.

I am stoked to start pulling some fonts, to start inking the machines, and to begin pressing some paper. I suppose I am answering my own question—inspiration comes from the strangest of places sometimes. It doesn't matter where. It simply matters how you use that time. 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1610969 2020-11-01T18:42:37Z 2020-12-13T21:41:53Z limoncello

Ingredients

  • 10 lemons
  • 1 (750-ml) bottle vodka
  • 3 1/2 cups water
  • 2 1/2 cups sugar

Directions

Using a vegetable peeler, remove the peel from the lemons in long strips (reserve the lemons for another use). Using a small sharp knife, trim away the white pith from the lemon peels; discard the pith. Place the lemon peels in a 2-quart pitcher. Pour the vodka over the peels and cover with plastic wrap. Steep the lemon peels in the vodka for 4 days at room temperature, away from sunlight. 

Stir the water and sugar in a large saucepan over medium heat until the sugar dissolves, about 5 minutes. Cool completely. Pour the sugar syrup over the vodka mixture. Cover and let stand at room temperature overnight. Strain the limoncello through a mesh strainer. Discard the peels. Transfer the limoncello to bottles. Seal the bottles and refrigerate until cold, at least 4 hours and up to 1 month.

Notes

For stronger limoncello, use equal parts Everclear and vodka. The higher alcohol content in the Everclear will also pull more of the oils from the lemon skins.  

Straining the peels through a cheesecloth will produce a more clear, refined limoncello. 

For bottling, the 8.5oz glass flip-top bottles (like the ones below) work well. Shop around on Amazon for the best deals, as prices vary. 

*While this post may have very little to do with doctoral programs, it made its way to this site for educational purposes. Not saying other limoncello recipes are bad, but I have tasted a few that were pretty bland. This recipe has never failed me, and I hope it inspires you to create some holiday cheer!

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1606604 2020-10-21T04:21:13Z 2020-10-21T04:21:13Z human capital

New course started yesterday. First post requires a bit of research to define “human capital” using a source other than the textbook or required readings. Interestingly, most of the the sources point to Adam Smith (of Scotland) or Marxist writings with the respect to the origin of the theory/idea of human capital. 

In a nutshell, several theories of human capital exist. And, in true fashion, there are alternative viewpoints that focus on Intellectual Capital, Social Capital, or Cultural Capital. Seems to me that it boils down to the old argument between information, knowledge, and ignorance. As a result, here’s what I’ve got so far: 

A fact is information minus emotion. An opinion is information plus experience. Ignorance is an opinion lacking information. And, stupidity is an opinion that ignores a fact.  

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1601490 2020-10-07T04:20:44Z 2020-10-07T04:20:44Z quantitative analysis The past few weeks have been intense. Intense with analysis and statistics. I have learned far more about regression analysis, t-tests, and ANOVA than I ever thought I might. And, I hate to break it to Salkind & Frey, but I still do not care for statistics. Hate is a strong word, but I do give the authors credit for making quantitive analysis slightly more palatable. 
I will say that I hate SPSS software. It is not only ridiculously expensive—it is ugly from a design perspective. I mean, a company who has beautifully designed websites, and even offered up one of my favorite typefaces for free, could do a little better. SPSS looks like the old Excel versions on Windows CE. Thankfully, the Dutch know how to make things pretty. And, they know how to make them open-source. Love me some JASP, even if it still is all about statistics.  
ps—speaking of the Dutch, Eddie Van Halen passed away today. We lost another one of the good ones today. RIP, Eddie. 
]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1589740 2020-09-02T03:50:22Z 2020-09-02T03:52:31Z levity

Running a hybrid model is exhausting. I am beginning to wonder if it is sustainable. If the "reply all" email threads that making the rounds are any indication, I think there are many teachers on the edge of a nervous breakdown. Running a hybrid model, AM and PM sessions around an A group and a B group on alternating days, is brutal. 

It is like working two jobs simultaneously, one as a classroom educator and the other as an online instructor. It is like teaching twice the case load. All while fielding emails and messages from students, staff, and parents. Passing periods are spent hustling to the restroom only to return to the classroom in time to wipe down all the desks and high touch-point areas with hypochlorous solution. We are all overworked and a bit stressed. So, now what? 

My point: no one is getting a prize for having it the worst. We are still all in this together. We just need to find a way to make it work. Whatever that looks like. 

Personally, I try to find the humor in it all. I certainly did not have Unhealthy Air Quality on my 2020 Apocalypse Bingo Card. And, I never imagined that I would be teaching from behind a plexiglass curtain that looks like a salad bar or sitting at a desk surrounded by tape on the floor like Les Nessman.  

And, I certainly wasn't ready for this little gem in my Quantitative Analysis textbook. 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1586174 2020-08-23T21:36:52Z 2020-08-23T21:36:53Z week 1 done

Being one of the few counties in the state with low COVID numbers, our school district was allowed to open with a hybrid model. AM and PM classes, with alternating days. 

The first week went fairly well. The students handled it better than staff, in my opinion. It has been a learning experience for everyone, coming off (emergency) distance learning to close out the end of the 2019-2020 school year. And, that learning curve has not been an easy one to bear. 

To say that teachers are stressed is understating the situation. I understand students are stressed, and parents are stressed. We are all under stress as we work to adjust to this new normal. I only point this out because I hear the stress in talking with students and staff. Daily, I see news articles about the stress teachers feel as they attempt to deliver quality instruction and learn new technologies.  

There is no baseline for the work we are doing. 

I feel it, too. Although, if I am being honest, my biggest concern is the future of education. I feel as if public education is setting itself up for changes that will quickly advance beyond its control. I worry that we are headed towards the privatization of education. 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1576003 2020-07-22T00:09:34Z 2020-07-22T00:09:34Z right now

The last few weeks have been stressful, really. There is no one contributing factor. It's all of it. I have been walking 3-4 miles per day in the morning just to relieve some of the stress. It helps. And, it makes for some nice sunrises. 

I know others feel this stress in various ways, and cope with the stress in their own ways. The sudden shut-down of schools in California on March 13th stressed everyone. The sudden realization that not all teachers are prepared to teach online...and that many students do not have access to wifi or a device. The businesses shutting down. The panic buying. 

Then, came talk of reopening businesses in California, only to be followed by the sudden decision on June 17th to close some businesses again. Panic buying is starting to trend again. My son's senior year will begin online. My school district has decided to go all-in with a traditional model (as of today) with the offer of an online model. To be honest, I am not sure how I feel about any of the models. I need to do more research. 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1572055 2020-07-11T19:41:36Z 2020-07-11T19:42:57Z re-opening school

I have given a lot of thought to the re-opening of schools in August. And, I have listened to some rich discussions on the matter. Twitter is full of thoughts on the idea. Several articles have been published recently that give me pause. This one made me chuckle...because there is a fine line between laughing and crying. 

Yet, it is maddening to think that leadership at the federal level keeps pushing misinformation or denying the science. I do not know what school will look like in August when students return. But, I know some tough decisions need to be made...by all stakeholders.  

I love the public schools my kids attend, but I also know they can't handle a lice outbreak on a good day and are not equipped to handle COVID on a bad one. School principals and superintendents are not epidemiologists or virologists and can’t possibly be expected to make plans like they are. 

—Dan Sinker, Esquire 


]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1563511 2020-06-22T23:30:40Z 2020-06-22T23:30:41Z study

It is difficult to understand the universe if you only study one planet.

—Miyamoto Musashi

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1560374 2020-06-16T21:53:37Z 2020-06-16T21:53:37Z DL

Distance Learning

Following on my previous post about leadership, I attended Day 1 of the Distance Learning Leadership Summit, hosted by the Santa Cruz County Office of Education. Good discussions, over all three days. No one knows the answers to the big questions around Distance Learning, but I am optimistic about the discussion and events like this.

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1559960 2020-06-15T23:39:27Z 2020-06-15T23:39:28Z leadership

I will soon complete my third class on leadership. I've learned a lot about:

  • Leadership theories
  • Leadership characteristics
  • Leadership behaviors
  • Leadership ethics

Apparently, this books covers all of it. As you can see, I have numerous pages tabbed as a reference. Trust that many of those pages are highlighted, as well.

While it may not the most exciting read, unless your super into leadership, Leadership by Northouse does provide some interesting information about leadership. The book provides context to the current state of affairs at both the state and federal levels.

Plus, the cover is kinda cool. It's like leadership, but one louder.

These go to 11.

—Nigel Tufnel, Spinal Tap




]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1552282 2020-05-31T21:29:07Z 2020-06-01T05:13:48Z black box thinking
Last week, I read this book as part of my doctoral studies. It draws parallels between the aviation industry and other business sectors. In a nutshell, the book is about failure and how failure can be the impetus of growth and change. 

Failure is a dirty word in most organizations. And, failure is something many of us are now experiencing given the ways in which the system has failed us. Failure of leadership at the national level in response to the pandemic. Failure to hold officials accountable for their actions. Failure to ensure all citizens are given equal rights under the law. I could keep going, but I my intent is not to point to all the failures, big and small, in society and business. My point in talking about failure to echo the theme of this book.

Simply stated, there is often a disparity in the approach to failure and how it can guide our thinking. This is especially true when comparing the aviation company's approach to failure with the approach taken in the health-care industry. If we fail to analyze our failures, fail to share our thinking, and fail to improve our approach, then we are destined to be stuck in a loop of blame and ignorance.

Fail hard. Fail often. Fail forward.

quotes from Black Box Thinking:

  • “Learn from the mistakes of others. You can’t live long enough to make them all yourself.”

  • “A failure to learn from mistakes has been one of the single greatest obstacles to human progress.”

  • “Society, as a whole, has a deeply contradictory attitude to failure. Even as we find excuses for our own failings, we are quick to blame others who mess up.”

  • “It is partly because we are so willing to blame others for their mistakes that we are so keen to conceal our own. We anticipate, with remarkable clarity, how people will react, how they will point the finger, how little time they will take to put themselves in the tough, high-pressure situation in which the error occurred. The net effect is simple: it obliterates openness and spawns cover-ups. It destroys the vital information we need in order to learn.”

  • “Only by redefining failure will we unleash progress, creativity, and resilience.”

  • “Attention, it turns out, is a scarce resource: if you focus on one thing, you will lose awareness of other things.”

  • “When people don’t interrogate errors, they sometimes don’t even know they have made one (even if they suspect they may have).”

  • “When we are confronted with evidence that challenges our deeply held beliefs we are more likely to reframe the evidence than we are to alter our beliefs. We simply invent new reasons, new justifications, new explanations. Sometimes we ignore the evidence altogether.”

  • “Cognitive dissonance occurs when mistakes are too threatening to admit to, so they are reframed or ignored. This can be thought of as the internal fear of failure: how we struggle to admit mistakes to ourselves.”

  • “The problem today is that we operate with a ballistic model of success. The idea is that once you’ve identified a target (creating a new website, designing a new product, improving a political outcome) you come up with a really clever strategy designed to hit the bullseye.”

  • “Success is not just dependent on before-the-event reasoning, it is also about after-the-trigger adaptation.”

  • “In the absence of data, narrative is the best we have.”

  • “Marginal gains is not about making small changes and hoping they fly. Rather, it is about breaking down a big problem into small parts in order to rigorously establish what works and what doesn’t.”

  • “Creativity is, in many respects, a response.”

  • “If we wish to fulfill our potential as individuals and organizations, we must redefine failure.”

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1546448 2020-05-24T15:41:00Z 2020-05-24T16:51:03Z life
The new normal.  
I've heard this phrase a lot lately. Repeated in the media, on twitter, and in conversations. It crops up almost as much as the word pivot...another word that needs to disappear. Even the meteorologist used it recently. "We are going to pivot into some warmer temperatures over the next few days." Ugh. 


But, the phrase the new normal bothers me. Why are we trying to normalize this pandemic? We have all made adjustments to our daily routines. We have watched the economy come to a grinding halt. And, now many public school districts are facing massive budget shortfalls. There is nothing normal about it. 

School will be different as the Fall semester begins. That much is certain. Students, parents, staff, and every stakeholder in education knows this. I am optimistic that education can shift away from high-stakes testing, but I worry that many of the services will be absent when kids return to school. Districts here in California are already planning to reduce staff. And, librarians and counselors top the list. Elective course, like art and computer science, may not exist in the Fall. 

It is difficult to see a way out of this new normal, I suppose. Maybe we are looking at this situation the wrong way. Maybe it requires us to look beyond the surface. Maybe something good can come of this situation and create a new and better normal. 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1544055 2020-05-13T21:02:22Z 2020-05-13T21:04:40Z rights & responsibilities

With the current discussion around the reopening of schools and businesses, there is little understanding of how accomplish it safely. I understand that many business owners want to generate revenue and employees want to return to work. And, I know many kids want to return to the classroom...just as most teachers and professors do. But, reopening schools and reopening businesses are two vastly different notions.  

I do not have the answers. I trust the scientists, physicians, immunologists, and other highly skilled people to find the answers. Yet, the divide between science and politics is evident in this country. Some want freedom, and to "liberate" their state from quarantine, while others wonder what else can be done. And, I think the image below sums up this argument quite nicely. 

Either way, school will look very different going forward. UC, CSU, and many community colleges have opted for online learning (distance learning) only for the Fall 2020 semester. While distance learning is better than nothing, it makes me wonder about the pedagogy and the practice of learning online. Education as we know it is changing. For some, this is a good thing. For others, this is terribly frightening. For me, it just shows that technology alone will not fix education. Students have a right to quality education. As educators, we have a responsibility to shape it into something amazing. 

Each new craze proclaims that the house is falling down, even as it does nothing to repair the real, foundational problems…

William Rankin 

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1535543 2020-04-25T22:34:53Z 2020-04-25T22:35:28Z zoomed

I've been on numerous Zoom calls these last few weeks. Not all of those calls were productive in terms of "work" accomplished but most all of them were engaging. I think it is the social aspect of school that we all miss the most. There is no doubt that the changes brought about by COVID-19 have altered how we "work from home" or "learn from home"...and I imagine that these changes will have lasting impacts on the ways we view education.

When will schools re-open? If they re-open in the Fall for the 2020-2021 school year, how will the schedules be structured? I do not know the answers to these questions...no one does. And, I think that is the source of anxiety for many. It is all speculation at this point, but school will look different. NPR posted a great article on this with 9 possible ways school will look going forward. Each scenario comes with its own unique challenges.

On a lighter note: I have found that my type cabinet makes a great stand-up desk. It's the little things.

]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1505387 2020-04-18T23:20:00Z 2020-04-18T23:20:21Z behaviors

Behaviors of Servant Leadership

Last week's studies detailed the 10 characteristics of servant leadership as identified by Spears (2002) from the writings of Robert Greenleaf. Now that I know the attributes of a servant leader, how do I begin to translate those dispositions into actions and behaviors? 

Liden, Wayne, Zhao, and Henderson (as cited in Northouse, 2019) identified seven behaviors as part of the servant leadership process. Each behavior can comprise multiple actions to accomplish the work of servant leadership. Here are the behaviors with some sample actions that servant leaders take to maintain the servant leadership model:

  1. Conceptualizing: deep understanding of an organization’s purpose, mission, goals, and problems (Northouse, 2019) 

  2. Emotional healing: showing active support for a person’s well-being 

  3. Put followers first: soulful connection with people, customers, and stakeholders  

  4. Helping followers grow and succeed: Mentoring is a conscious effort to help followers (Murphy, 2011)

  5. Behaving ethically: leading by example and modeling the values that the organization espouses (Kouzes & Posner, 2012) 

  6. Empowering: providing the freedom and support for followers to make independent decisions (Northouse, 2019) 

  7. Creating value for the community: goes beyond the core business of an organization 

To lead people, walk behind them.

—Lao Tzu
]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1532686 2020-04-18T06:09:06Z 2020-04-18T06:09:06Z ch-ch-cha-changes

What a crazy couple of weeks. I am in the process of completing my Spring semester, wrapping up a full year of doctoral studies. A full year that includes a summer session. And, switching campuses...as Concordia University-Portland closed after 100+ years and I was tasked with enrolling at Concordia University-Chicago.

Then, there was a sudden shift to "distance learning" as schools have closed for the year. It's been a crazy weeks all wrapped up in a ridiculous set of circumstances. It's hot. It's cold. And, rarely it's just right.

Participating in a tonight's #midnighpedagogy session there was talk about the Goldilocks Option. That got me thinking that maybe this year is like the Goldilocks Option gone rogue: it's too hot, it's too cold, and sometimes it's just right. The problem is the sometimes. But, the sometimes can be sweet. I need to remember that part.

Things change. Options change. And, take time for the sweets. Like WuTan flan. 

*photo source unknown
]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1531589 2020-04-15T15:53:21Z 2020-04-15T15:55:39Z f/u

f/u = follow up 

I always love writing that abbreviation in my notes. It makes me smile. It’s the little things. 

It seems like I’ve been doing quite a bit of “follow up” lately. Following up with distance learning lessons, doctoral studies, Zoom conference schedules, and DIY projects around the house. 

It’s weird, but I actually like working from home.  I never thought I would. But, now that I am getting used to the pace and the schedule of working from home, I enjoy it. 

My “office” for afternoon calls isn’t so bad, either. 


]]>
tag:blog.qsprn.com,2013:Post/1528168 2020-04-07T04:01:28Z 2020-04-07T04:01:29Z shelter in place

That’s the order from the California governor, and echoed by the federal government. I’m practicing physical distancing and wearing a face mask (bandana) when venturing out for essentials items. And, now more than ever, my home is my sanctuary. 

It’s time to upgrade the sanctuary. Tore down the print shop (bedroom), even the closet. Fresh coat of paint + new floors. Those floors got my OCD level orange going, but it’s done. And. It looks awesome. Now, to move all the furniture, type cabinets, and supplies. Spring break is looking good in the sanctuary. 

#CovidCribs #QuarantineLife 

]]>